Young producers meet in Topeka for first session

March 29, 2018

Young cattlemen and women from across the state met in Topeka February 12-13 for the first installment of the 2018 KLA Young Stockmen’s Academy (YSA). Merck Animal Health is again partnering with the association to host these members for an in-depth look into KLA and the beef industry. A series of four seminars will be held throughout the year in various locations in Kansas.

During this session, the 20 attendees learned about the array of member services provided by KLA, heard about the importance of being an advocate for the livestock industry, saw KLA lobbyists in action at the state Capitol and took part in the KLA Legislative Meeting. In addition, YSA members attended a Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee meeting at the Capitol and participated in a financial planning seminar conducted by KCoe Isom. 

As part of an interactive training session led by KLA staff, White City rancher and beef advocate Debbie Lyons-Blythe and WIBW-Topeka farm broadcaster Greg Akagi, the group was given an overview of various media outlets available to help tell the beef production story. Lyons-Blythe shared how she has implemented advocacy into her daily routine through the use of her blog, “Kids, Cows and Grass”. 

Members of the 2018 YSA class are Jill Carr, Dwight; Cole Gardiner, Ashland; Ethan Horne, Marquette; Scott Jones, Melvern; Laura Klenda, Marion; Megan Larson, Olsburg; Jacquelyne Leffler, Americus; Bracey Lerner, Manhattan; Megan Ludwig, Pratt; Justin Reeve, Garden City; Marisa Rose, Russell; Jared Seeley, Eureka; Barrett Simon, Beloit; Rochelle Smart, Iola; Katelyn Steffens, Dighton; Rossie Stephens, Grinnell; Gretchen Stroberg, Hutchinson; Linden Stueve, Olpe; Ben Wheaton, Lewis; and Rusty Wiggs, Topeka. 

The second session for the YSA class will be held in May. Members will have the opportunity to learn more about the agribusiness and retail beef industries. More information about YSA can be found at www.kla.org. 

KLA is a trade organization representing the business interests of members at both the state and federal levels. Voluntary dues dollars paid by producers are used for programs that benefit KLA members in the areas of legislative representation, regulatory assistance, legal troubleshooting, communications and the advancement of youth.

-30-